Tag Archives: Repression

First they came for the anarchists…..Grand Jury Defense Info

The US government has lately been stepping up the political repression, especially in the midwest and northwest.  Recently grand jury subpoenas have been sent out to the bay area animal rights and environmental movements.  Revolutionaries in the bay should be prepared, as in this author’s opinion it’s coming here next.  Luckily our comrades in the northwest have been organizing hard, and have provided us with some extremely useful and in-depth information.  For those that were unable to attend the recent information session down here, check out the audio from the event.  Just to emphasize: this is likely going to become practical information very soon, and the more people that understand the complexities, the quicker we’re going to be able to respond.

 

Preparation is safety, unity is strength!

 

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EMERGENCY Rally and Protest: Solidarity with South African miners murdered during strike

Please Forward Widely:
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SOLIDARITY WITH SOUTH AFRICAN MINERS
Emergency Rally & Protest
Friday August 24th 2012 @ 5pm 
Oscar Grant Plaza (aka Frank Ogawa Plaza)
 
Protest the murder of 40 striking mine workers by the South African Government.  Stand in solidarity with the mine workers as they continue their battle with the Lonmin Platinum Mine and the murderous government police force.  Workers in all countries must come together to resist these atrocities carried out by the state in the interests of International Capitalism.  As working class organizations we strongly believe that:“an injury to one IS an injury to all.”
 
We’ll see you Friday at 5pm. Thank you.
 
Initiated by Advance the Struggle in conjunction with the Oscar Grant Committee Against Police Brutality and State Repression. Please contact us if your organization would like to be included as an endorser: bay.strikes@gmail.com
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From Oakland to South Africa, 
one struggle, one fight!

San Francisco 8

CRUEL AND UNUSUAL — Hank Jones and Ray Boudreaux spoke before the Pasadena ACLU May 12 to tell the story of the “San Francisco 8,” former members and/or associates of the Black Panther Party who have been charged with the 1970 killing of a San Francisco police officer. The case against the men, initially dismissed in 1975 because confessions from some of them had been based on torture, was reopened in 2007.

CRUEL AND UNUSUAL — Hank Jones and Ray Boudreaux spoke before the Pasadena ACLU May 12 to tell the story of the “San Francisco 8,” former members and/or associates of the Black Panther Party who have been charged with the 1970 killing of a San Francisco police officer. The case against the men, initially dismissed in 1975 because confessions from some of them had been based on torture, was reopened in 2007.

At first glance, the SF8 are just another case of police abuse and the corrupt criminal (in)justice system. Our sympathies are with them, as they are with Mumia and Leonard Peltier and hundreds of other political prisoners, but no lasting movement has developed with the kind of strength to affect the outcome of the trial and end their persecution. The community knows the cops are a daily obstacle and are even dangerous, but the community has not seemed ready to get behind a campaign to end it.

There seem to be three models of resistance to police. The first model, which members of the SF8 ascribed to was the Black Panther model. It involved outflanking the police by building community support and conducting armed patrols of neighborhoods to monitor police.

The second model is the “police accountability” model that has been adopted by the Coalition Against Police Executions (CAPE), a coalition of Oakland non-profit organizations. This aims at reforming the police but essentially leaving them as they are, with some minor changes such as sensitivity training an extra layer of bureacracy in the form of citizen review boards.

The third model is the spontaneous eruption of anger and desperations by those members of the community that deal most directly with the police. Young black and brown men and boys from the hood that are unemployed and involved in informal markets often through gangs have shown what their response to police abuse is: riots and “cop killing.” While these responses are barely worth considering as “models” they are inform the analysis, especially considering that they are the most hotly sought after constituency for both reform organizations such as the non-profit sector (see Ella Baker Center’s “Silence the Violence Campaign”) AND militant community organizers (like the Panthers).
Instead of repeating the same sob story about police “terrorism,” and boring folks with legal details from the case, can we pose this question to working class black and brown communities: out of these three  strategies – militant direct action community organizing, liberal compromising non-profit coalitions, random acts of violence – which approach is the most effective? When they answer that the militant direct action community organizing (panther) model is best, can we pose a follow-up question: who’s going to build such an organization to do that work?

Instead of imploring people to act in sympathy for these innocent old men, we should present them with the opportunity to act on their own behalf in these old men’s righteous example.

San Francisco 8 Members Blame Murder Charges on Police Corruption

Strike in Mozambique: Police Shoot Two Workers

Workers in Maputo

Workers in Maputo

International capital, in its search for outlets for investment in these times of worldwide stagnation, turns increasingly toward Africa. China, which itself had become the focus for foreign investment a couple decades ago, now has enough capital of its own to unleash on the world and Africa is one of its favorite targets. It is encouraging to see that Mozambiquan workers stand up to the exploitation and oppression that comes with this investment, as they have throughout the history of their interaction with the capitalist world system. As African ruling classes try so desperately to attract capital, the workers defend themselves from the consequences. As our president, partly of African heritage, takes steps to establish African Command – a regional military mega-center – and encourage capital to flow into the region, US workers have a new opportunity to develop international proletarian consciousness and to express solidarity. Solidarity is best expressed through being inspired to resist the system and do a fair share of the fighting. Are we fulfilling our duties to our class? African workers are.

Read about the Mozambique strike here.